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Guide on cross-border enforcement

This guide aims to provide an overview of the main legal acts in the European Union that deal with cross-border enforcement of authentic instruments. It deals with the most relevant EU regulations for European notaries. International conventions, such as the Lugano Convention or the 41st Hague Convention (the HCCH “Judgements” Convention of 2019), which has not yet come into force, shall not be dealt with.

Practitioners’ guide on the “Public Documents Regulation” (regulation 2016/1191)

The present guide seeks to provide notaries with practical information on Regulation (EU) 2016/1191 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 July 2016 on promoting the free movement of citizens which aims at simplifying administrative formalities for the circulation of public documents, certified copies and related translations.

Explanatory handbook on Council Regulation (EU) 2016/1103 of 24 June 2016 implementing enhanced cooperation in the area of jurisdiction, applicable law and the recognition and enforcement of decisions in matters of matrimonial property regimes

A new European regulation was adopted on 24 June 2016 on the matrimonial property regimes of couples with a foreign element. The regulation establishes harmonised connecting factors to determine the law applicable to matrimonial property regimes in addition to the jurisdiction competent to rule on all civil law aspects of matrimonial property regimes, concerning both the everyday management of the couple’s property and the liquidation of the matrimonial property. The regulation simplifies the recognition and enforcement of judgments and the acceptance and enforcement of authentic instruments linked to matrimonial property regimes. This handbook aims to present to you the main features of this regulation and familiarise you with how to deal with a matrimonial property regime with a foreign element.

Explanatory handbook on Council Regulation (EU) 2016/1104 of 24 June 2016 implementing enhanced cooperation in the area of jurisdiction, applicable law and the recognition and enforcement of decisions in matters of the property consequences of registered partnerships

A new European regulation was adopted on 24 June 2016 on the property consequences of registered partnerships of couples with a foreign element. The regulation establishes harmonised connecting factors to determine the law applicable to the property consequences of partnerships and to designate the jurisdiction competent to rule on all civil law aspects of the property consequences of registered partnerships, concerning both the everyday management of the partners’ assets and their liquidation. The regulation simplifies the recognition and enforcement of judgments and the acceptance and enforcement of authentic instruments linked to the property consequences of registered partnerships. This handbook aims to present to you the main features of this regulation and familiarise you with how to deal with the property consequences of a registered partnership with a foreign element.

Explanatory handbook on EU Regulation 650/2012 on international successions

EU Regulation 650/2012 on international successions provides a simplified framework for people who have private and financial interests in at least two countries, both within and outside the European Union. The regulation introduces a single connecting factor, the law of the last habitual residence of the deceased, in order to designate both the competent jurisdiction to rule on the whole of a succession and the law applicable to a succession. It also introduces the possibility to choose the law of one of the states whose nationality one possesses as the law applicable to one’s succession. The regulation creates the European Certificate of Succession, which will be automatically recognised in all Member States. This handbook aims to present to you the main features of this regulation and familiarise you with how to deal with a succession that has a foreign element.